Life As We Knew It

Pfeffer, S. (2006). Life As We Knew It. FL: Harcourt.

Told through Miranda’s journal entries, we follow her life as it changes from a regular, suburban experience to a dystopian tale once a meteor collides into the moon, altering lifeasweknewitits course and pushing it closer to earth. Volcanic ash hangs in the air blocking the sun, tsunamis are blanketing the coasts, and families are hoarding supplies. Miranda’s modern blended family is surviving in their sun room, huddled around a heater.

Pfeffer’s storytelling style is emotional. This isn’t an adventure packed ride, but an even more terrifyingly psychological one that touches on the human condition.

”I don’t even know why I’m writing this down, except that I feel fine and maybe tomorrow I’ll be dead. And if that happens, and someone should find my journal, I want them to know what happened.

We are a family. We love each other. We’ve been scared together and brave together. If this is how it ends, so be it.

Only, please, don’t let me be the last one to die.”

An addictive dystopian, post-apocalyptic, survival story, and also a great introduction to young adult fiction.

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Every Day

Levithan D. (2012). Every Day. NY: Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Now a movie, the sci-fi concept behind this young adult love story is that there is a spirit who wakes up in a different body each day. One day the spirit wakes in the body of someone with a everydaygirlfriend. Upon meeting her and spending the most beautiful day together, he falls in love. Unfortunately she attributes his romantic nature to her boyfriend, not the spirit. He spends awhile waking up in different bodies, always going to her, finding her and attempting to convince her of what’s going on. You can imagine some of the funny conversations and disbelief on her part!

Every Day integrates interesting topics throughout as we see the spirit enter different bodies. This “what if” science fiction novel explores what it means to be genderless, without a body, and without a family.

Illuminae

Kaufman A. & Kristoff J. (2015). Illuminae. New York: Ember.

Illuminae is a stunning book about an illegal mining colony that gets attacked by a rival mining corporation. The plot is told in an unusual fashion, as the book does not contain 23395680.jpgthe normal word after word story. Instead it is mostly comprised of several chat rooms, emails, maps, interviews, transcripts, etc.  This style of telling the story makes a real impact and you feel like you’re right there experiencing these events with the characters. The story follows two main characters, Kady, onboard a science vessel called The Hypatia and Ezra, onboard an attack vessel called The Alexander. They’re just two of the thousands of refugees that escaped the attack. Now they’re part of a heavily damaged fleet that’s slowly limping towards safety, a wormhole station called Heimdall, with an attack vessel, The Lincoln, slowly closing in to mop up the mess. If they don’t think of something to get to the wormhole in time, The Lincoln will destroy the fleet, killing everyone. It feels like it couldn’t get any worse, except it could. From a faulty and somewhat lethal  Continue reading