The Book Jumper

Glaser, M. (2017). The Book Jumper. NY: Feiwel & Friends.

This is one you’ve got to read if you’re a bibliophile and you liked the concept of Inkheart. In The Book Jumper, Amy Lennox and her mother pick up and travel from 29102939-2Germany to her grandmother’s house on the Scottish island of Stormsay. She’s not looking forward to it, and upon arrival her grandmother already has one rule in place – she must read. Except Amy discovers she has the power to jump into books and interact with the characters! In fact, she discovers her family shares this skill and they are also keepers of an antiquated library. Amy quickly learns that a book jumper’s duty is to insure important ideas aren’t stolen from books; indeed, there is a book thief on the prowl. She meets another book jumper, Will, and together they travel from world to world, meeting famous characters and fighting to save crucial ideas before the books themselves are lost forever.

Incredibly crafted and plot-driven, this story is unique enough to keep you happy. I especially found myself wrapped up in the Gothic island setting.

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Library Lion

127179
Knudsen, M. (2006). Library Lion. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Candlewick Press.

Awards: NAIBA Book of the Year for Picture Book (2007)
School Library Journal’s Best Books of 2006
A New York Times best seller.

Ms. Merriweather has strict rules in her library. When, a lion saunters into the children’s area he is allowed to stay because after all, there are no rules forbidding lions. After a nap on the pillows, he joins story time, causes quite a commotion, and is spoken to by Ms. Merriweather. With renewed understanding of the rules, the lion becomes a cherished fixture with the children and staff until one day, he Continue reading