The Other Boy

Hennessey, M.G. (2016). The Other Boy. NY: Harper Collins.

Los Angeles has been good to Shane Woods, a twelve year old who likes baseball, comics, and who has lived as a boy since moving there years ago. Everything is going swell. He 28371999and his best friend, Josh, even have a spot on the baseball team. But it all comes crashing down when a bully discovers Shane’s secret, one he has not even revealed to Josh yet (he always planned to!) because well, it never seemed to be the right time.

The Other Boy
highlights emotional pressures some transgender kids endure in elementary Continue reading

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Agatha Christie Graphic Novels Series (24 books)

Hughot. (2007). The Man in the Brown Suit. (Agatha Christie Graphic Novels #10). NY: HarperTorch.

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What?! No one told you there were Agatha Christie graphic novels? Well it’s true, and they are delightful, especially for the Christie connoisseur. Let’s take a look at The Man in the 2489221-1.jpgBrown Suit. When a man is killed by a tube train, a young woman initiates an investigation to solve the mystery. This adaptation holds more charm than it can handle but reader beware, if you haven’t familiarized yourself with Christie’s writing, you’ll be missing out on the fullness of the characters and the rich, detailed story, both of which can not possibly be done justice in a comic strip of this length. However, if you are a Poirot or Marple or Tommy and Tuppence fan, go ahead and partake with abandon. Luxuriate in the art deco-esque illustrations and ignore the thinner plot.

Pax

Pennypacker S. (2016). Pax. New York: Balzer + Bray.

A beautifully crafted tale with incredible illustrations by Jon Klassen, Pax is a wonderful story that pulls you in and keeps you reading until the last page. Pax was an orphaned fox 22098550.jpgcub when his ‘boy,’ Peter, found him by the side of a road. Since then, they’ve been inseparable. Wherever Peter has gone Pax has gone; it feels like they’ve been together forever. Pax was there for Peter when his mom died, and Peter has always been there for Pax.  Everything was perfect. Until one day. With the war coming, Peter’s father has signed up for the army. To Pax’s surprise, on the way to Peter’s grandfathers house they stop by the side of a large forest and get out of the car. Peter is crying and Pax can’t figure out what’s wrong. Then Pax is left behind on purpose in the wild and Peter is delivered to live at his grandfather’s house so his father can go to the war. But immediately, Peter is wracked with guilt over allowing his father to convince him to leave a tame fox in the woods, and he embarks on a long, challenging journey through the wild. This sparks two heart wrenching tales, one of a tame fox’s adventures in the wild and the other a story of a boy trying to find his fox.

We Are Okay

LaCour N. (2017). We Are Okay. New York: Dutton Books for Young Readers.

We Are Okay‘s entrancing cover with a girl standing on her bed looking out into the ocean is perfect for this psychological mystery told through flashbacks. Marin is at 28243032university in upper state New York, having fled from California and the very people who love and want to support her following her Gramps’ death. Truly an orphan now, it’s turns out to be the secrets Marin encountered, slowly revealed to us, that made her abruptly leave home and cut off all ties.

When the story begins Marin is staying on an isolated college campus over winter break. Her roommate, Hannah, just left for Christmas, and now she is expecting a visit from her best friend, Mabel. As you may imagine, the December New York setting is stark, cold, and isolated, ready to match Marin’s depression. We aren’t privy to the background of Marin and Mabel’s relationship, yet like the rest of the story it Continue reading