Foolish Hearts

Mills E. (2017). Foolish Hearts. NY: Henry Holt and Co.

During the last party of the summer, Claudia gets caught eavesdropping — purely by mistake — on an extremely private conversation. Once school starts up again in the fall, 33275690she and Iris, one the girls from that painful conversation, are paired up for a school project. Contemptuous, disdainful, and scornful Iris is a handful to try to work with civilly, and even though they want to be as far apart as possible, they both end up trying out for the school play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

The many characters are all incredibly real and complex. This is a great book if you happen to love theatre, or gaming, or have ever been in true love with a band, all which are discussed in detail. Gone are the paranormal, outer space and the zombies. This is a real people story. And it’s exceptional.

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They Both Die at the End

Silvera A. (2017). They Both Die at the End. NY: HarperTeen.

It’s the near future and in this future, the government knows when everyone dies. At around midnight two teens Rufus and Mateo receive the dreaded phone call from Death-Cast Organization claiming that they are both going to die today. They aren’t told how or theybothdieattheend.jpgexactly when they will die, only that there is no stopping it. Both have decided that they don’t want to spend their last day alone and as fate would have it, they find each other on the Last Friend App. Once total strangers, the two meet up for one last great adventure before they die. They Both Die at the End makes you wonder, what would you do on your last day?

Allegedly

Jackson, T. (2017). Allegedly. NY: Katherine Tegen Books.

Mary B. Addison killed a baby. Allegedly. She didn’t say much in that first interview with detectives, and the media filled in the only blanks that mattered: a white baby had died while under the care of a churchgoing black woman and her nine-year-old daughter. The public convicted Mary and the jury made it official.

Step back, because you may have an idea of how this story could unfold, but there is a lot waiting under the surface. In a heart-wrenching, emotional break out novel, Tiffany Jackson allegedlydelivers true grit on the page. Mary has been in Baby Jail and group “homes” ever since being convicted at age 9 for the death of a baby her momma was babysitting. Mary hasn’t believed it mattered much if she covered for her momma, who could have been given the death penalty, but now she has a reason to tell the truth.

This is a horrific look at the American juvenile justice system and the blind racism intertwined within it. As intelligent as she is, the abuse Mary suffers throughout her life shaped who she is as a person.

Be on the lookout for Tiffany D. Jackson’s next book. Powerful writing!

Dear Martin

Stone, N. (2017). Dear Martin. NY: Crown Books.

Powerful and poignant, this story is written about one young man’s struggle with race in Atlanta, Georgia. Following closely on the heels of the publication of The Hate You Give24974996-2 by Angie Thomas, Dear Martin also tackles contemporary confrontations between young, black man and white policemen.

Justyce Allistar is a competitive student and athlete, looking toward university next fall. Still, he struggles with the kids at his old school, plus the kids at his new prep school. So he starts a journal to Martin Luther King Jr. But are his teachings still relevant? Will Martin’s teachings or Justyce’s writings be enough to survive today?

An intense, quick read.

A Line in the Dark

Malinda L. (2017). A Line in the Dark. NY: Dutton Books for Young Readers.

A fun, contemporary mystery, this one is a psychological thriller. You may not be sure where this mystery is leading, and you may be quite surprised at the ending! A Line in 9780803739260_NearlyGone_JKT.inddthe Dark has a love triangle between three young women. Jess, the main character, is crazy in love with her best friend, Angie. The admiration seems a bit one sided to start with, and then Angie begins a relationship with Margot.

Margot attends prep school where she and her friend, Ryan, usher them into their private school world and the secrets that hide there. It’s revealed that Angie and Ryan have a secret of their own that may turn the entire mystery.

90 Days of Different

Walters, E. (2017). 90 Days of Different: Orca Publishers.

Cute and lighthearted, Eric Walters’ new one, 90 Days of Different, chronicles the summer Sophie has turned eighteen, is waiting to go to university, and her boyfriend has recently 34332334dumped her because she’s too predictable and boring. While the book itself can be a little predictable, it is not boring. In fact once Sophie’s best friend, Ella, who agrees with the ex-boyfriend, challenges Sophie to do one new and different thing each day of the summer, it’s then very quick and charming. Sophie imagines this challenge will transform her from boring into fun, so she agrees to let Ella set and and schedule the entire summer of challenges.

The chapters swing quickly through hilarious situations where Sophie is far out of her comfort zone. As far as character development goes, Sophie does grow, but there are so many various things going on with a new addition each day, that we don’t get an in depth look at who Sophie is becoming.

When Dimple Met Rishi

Menon, S. (2017). When Dimple Met Rishi. NY: Simon & Shuster.

Dimple and Rishi, two Indian-America teenagers, have finished high school and are excited to brave the beginning of the rest of their lives, however each have very different28458598 viewpoints of what that looks like. Dimple (who unfortunately never materialized any real dimples to live up to her name) has passionately chosen to pursue her career, beginning with a Stanford education. Rishi on the other hand is more traditional, choosing tradition and obedience over doing what makes his soul sing. His little brother, who is now bigger, taller, and much more muscular than the MIT-bound Rishi, suggests he be more balanced and reminds him of the comics he used to love.

Dimple and Rishi go to a computer programming summer camp in San Francisco; Dimple is thrilled to be studying with some of the best in the field and surprised her parents allowed her to go, while Rishi signed up because both sets of parents have actually set up an arranged marriage for their children and want them to get to know each other a bit before leaving for colleges on separate coasts. Rishi, a Continue reading