In 27 Days

Gervais, A. (2017). In 27 Days. NY: Blink.

Hadley Jamison has grown accustomed to being on her own. Her big time lawyer parents are revered in New York City, their time all too often occupied with work. She has a few 32830562good friends at her prep school, but when a student’s suicide is announced, Hadley’s sense of loneliness is heightened and it affects Hadley profoundly. Deciding to go to Archer Morales funeral ends up being a decision that changes her life – and many lives. She meets Death himself and signs a contract to go back in time, 27 days, to the first day Archer considered suicide in hopes of changing history. Of course, there are complications …

The characters feel real, even Death. Devouring the book only made me sad to finish. I’ll definitely be including this one in my book talks at high schools (#librarian life)!


And Then There Were Four

Werlin, N. (2017). And Then There Were Four. New York: Penguin Random House.

Five prep school kids are tossed together under mysterious circumstances. When one is 32074843-2murdered, they begin talking and piecing together what they know about their families, and a terrifying idea surfaces. What if they are all targets? The premise is classically entertaining, mimicking Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None, when a group of strangers are assembled on a remote island only to be murdered one by one.

The chapters alternate between two of the five friends, Saralinda and Caleb, she speaking in the present tense, he in the past for some reason, but both pushing forward the pace of the story. Nancy Werlin knows how to create complex characters whose voices captivate us. We become swept up into the mystery as they go on the run from their cloistered, island-esqe school to an actual island, Fire Island in New York. Here there are no cars, only dirt paths through tall grass, and little Continue reading

Felt songs and rhymes

Playing with language is a pretty awesome way to spend some quality time together with your little one. Rhyming is important because it shows children how language works. Rhymes help children experience the rhythm of language and notice and work with the sounds within words. When children are familiar with a nursery rhyme, they learn to anticipate the rhyming word. This prepares them to make predictions when they read – another important reading skill.

My daughter, Sophie, offered to make this felt set to the simple, but endlessly fun children’s chant:

Little mouse, little mouse,
come out to play.
What colour house
are you in today?

Soft and beautiful! Storytime will be great! Thank you, Sophie!!


Switching gears

🙂 I’ve finished my Masters in Library and Information Studies (MLIS), am officially a librarian, and am busy calculating how many times I can legitimately work these amazing facts into random conversation.

In the spirit of change, I’m challenging myself to read roughly one Young Adult (YA) book a week – with the occasional assistance of my own three teenage readers. Game on!

Happy New Year, everyone! Let me know what you’re reading, and what you want me to read & review.