Allegedly

Jackson, T. (2017). Allegedly. NY: Katherine Tegen Books.

“Mary B. Addison killed a baby. Allegedly. She didn’t say much in that first interview with detectives, and the media filled in the only blanks that mattered: a white baby had died while under the care of a churchgoing black woman and her nine-year-old daughter. The public convicted Mary and the jury made it official.

Step back, because you may have an idea of how this story could unfold, but there is a lot waiting under the surface. In a heart-wrenching, emotional break out novel, Tiffany Jackson allegedlydelivers true grit on the page. Mary has been in Baby Jail and group “homes” ever since being convicted at age 9 for the death of a baby her momma was babysitting. Mary hasn’t believed it mattered much if she covered for her Continue reading

Tell Me Three Things

Bauxbaum, J. (2016). Tell Me Three Things. NY: Delacorte Press .

With the perfect mix of comedy and tragedy, love and loss, pain and joy, the characters in Julie Bauxbaum’s Tell Me Three Things come to feel like old friends who make any day V23 new typeface tagline.inddbetter. This young adult novel is sure to appeal to fans of Rainbow Rowell, Jennifer Niven, and E. Lockhart.

Everything about Jessie is wrong. At least, that’s what it feels like during her first week of junior year at her new ultra-intimidating prep school in Los Angeles. It’s been barely two years since her mother’s death, and because her father eloped with a woman he met online, Jessie has been forced to move across the country to live with her stepmonster and her pretentious teenage son, and to start at a new school where she knows no one.

Just when she’s thinking about hightailing it back to Chicago, she gets an email from a person calling themselves Somebody/Nobody (SN for short), offering to help her Continue reading

Every Day

Levithan D. (2012). Every Day. NY: Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Now a movie, the sci-fi concept behind this young adult love story is that there is a spirit who wakes up in a different body each day. One day the spirit wakes in the body of someone with a everydaygirlfriend. Upon meeting her and spending the most beautiful day together, he falls in love. Unfortunately she attributes his romantic nature to her boyfriend, not the spirit. He spends awhile waking up in different bodies, always going to her, finding her and attempting to convince her of what’s going on. You can imagine some of the funny conversations and disbelief on her part!

Every Day integrates interesting topics throughout as we see the spirit enter different bodies. This “what if” science fiction novel explores what it means to be genderless, without a body, and without a family.

Genuine Fraud

Lockhart, E. (2017). Genuine Fraud. NY: Delacorte Press.

It is very rare that you read a book and are shocked by the ending. We Were Liars by the same author was one of those books. Although Genuine Fraud is completely different, genuinefraudthere are parts of this book that surprised.

It begins at the end of the book, where one of the main characters, Jules, is running from the FBI, but you don’t know why. The setting starts off in a swanky resort in a warm climate. From there you begin to read backwards and you slowly discover why she is running from the police. What you discover is a young woman who has been trained to be a spy since her spy parents were murdered when she was little. She has become a polarizing villain, who Continue reading

A Line in the Dark

Malinda L. (2017). A Line in the Dark. NY: Dutton Books for Young Readers.

A fun, contemporary mystery, this one is a psychological thriller. You may not be sure where this mystery is leading, and you may be quite surprised at the ending! A Line in 9780803739260_NearlyGone_JKT.inddthe Dark has a love triangle between three young women. Jess, the main character, is crazy in love with her best friend, Angie. The admiration seems a bit one sided to start with, and then Angie begins a relationship with Margot.

Margot attends prep school where she and her friend, Ryan, usher them into their private school world and the secrets that hide there. It’s revealed that Angie and Ryan have a secret of their own that may turn the entire mystery.

90 Days of Different

Walters, E. (2017). 90 Days of Different: Orca Publishers.

Cute and lighthearted, Eric Walters’ new one, 90 Days of Different, chronicles the summer Sophie has turned eighteen, is waiting to go to university, and her boyfriend has recently 34332334dumped her because she’s too predictable and boring. While the book itself can be a little predictable, it is not boring. In fact once Sophie’s best friend, Ella, who agrees with the ex-boyfriend, challenges Sophie to do one new and different thing each day of the summer, it’s then very quick and charming. Sophie imagines this challenge will transform her from boring into fun, so she agrees to let Ella set and and schedule the entire summer of challenges.

The chapters swing quickly through hilarious situations where Sophie is far out of her comfort zone. As far as character development goes, Sophie does grow, but there are so many various things going on with a new addition each day, that we don’t get an in depth look at who Sophie is becoming.

There’s Someone in Your House

Perkins, S. (2017). There’s Someone in Your House. NY: Dutton Books for Young Readers.

Stephanie Perkins takes a departure from her sweet teen romances (Anna and the French Kiss, Isla and the Happily Ever After) to delve into the world of teen slashers. There’s 15797848Someone in Your House is as spooky as it sounds. When Makani Young leaves behind her dark past in Hawaii to come live with her grandmother in Nebraska for the final year of high school, she tries to stop hating herself and make a new start. Her friends, Darby, Alex, and Ollie are diverse and each have a perspective to contribute to the plot.

I needed to suspend my disbelief throughout the book in order to derive the most pleasure possible and just enjoy it for what it is. The killer is actually revealed halfway through the book – the biggest bummer to me – and it wasn’t even a huge reveal or shock. Also, their motive felt like something an adult would feel after years of reflection. But again, no big deal if you’re willing to go with it. It’s mostly a love story after all.

The creepy crawly things that happened were fun, and even though I wouldn’t give this book particularly high marks, I would still recommend it if the title peaks your interest and you need to fall into a tumultuous teen drama.

The 57 Bus

Slater, CD. (2017). The 57 Bus. NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

The 57 Bus reads along like a fictional story. You meet characters, learn about their lives, and begin to root for these teens because they’re all good kids. But one wrong, spur of the 33155325moment decision, and now this story has become tragedy of sorts. The setting is Oakland, California, where there is a huge disparity of wealth, but it’s also one of the more progressively-minded cities in the States. As the city bus criss-crossed different pockets of Oakland, two teen-agers overlapped paths on their ride home from school everyday for a short eight minutes. Robert and his buddies are black and are from a crime-ridden neighbourhood; Sasha is white, attends a private school, and identifies as agender  – neither male nor female. Fooling around, the teens egg on Robert to light the edge of Sasha’s skirt on fire as he sleeps. The material catches on the fourth try. Robert and his friends jump off the bus and turn around to the see the doors closing and Sacha’s skirt erupting in a ball of flames. They ended up with second and third degree burns.

The 57 Bus is a true story. The author elaborates on her 2015 New York Times Magazine article, compiling a book full of interviews, social media posts, Continue reading

Bud, Not Buddy

Curtis, C. (1999). Bud, Not Buddy. NY: Delacorte Books for Young Readers .

John Newbery Award, 2000
Coretta Scott King Award, 2000

Set against the historical backdrop of the Jazz Era during the Depression, Bud will have you howling out loud with laughter, talking back to the book, and cheering on ten-year 368468old Bud Caldwell. Bud (NOT Buddy – there’s a lot to a name!) has been bounced from home to foster home since his mama died when he was six. He’s never known his father, but he has himself convinced his dad must be the famous jazz musician, Herman E. Calloway, because his mama always kept posters of his band. When Bud finds himself on the lam from the Home, he sets off through cardboard jungles and goes on the rails to search for his father. Bud is fortunate enough to own his own suitcase (all the other boys at the Home have to put their belongings in a paper bag or pillow case) where he carefully stores the posters, along with a blanket, and other important necessities that make for a travelling home.

Bud’s sense of humour shows periodically; “Bud Caldwell’s Rules and Things to have a Funner

Continue reading