Agatha Christie Graphic Novels Series (24 books)

Hughot. (2007). The Man in the Brown Suit. (Agatha Christie Graphic Novels #10). NY: HarperTorch.

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What?! No one told you there were Agatha Christie graphic novels? Well it’s true, and they are delightful, especially for the Christie connoisseur. Let’s take a look at The Man in the 2489221-1.jpgBrown Suit. When a man is killed by a tube train, a young woman initiates an investigation to solve the mystery. This adaptation holds more charm than it can handle but reader beware, if you haven’t familiarized yourself with Christie’s writing, you’ll be missing out on the fullness of the characters and the rich, detailed story, both of which can not possibly be done justice in a comic strip of this length. However, if you are a Poirot or Marple or Tommy and Tuppence fan, go ahead and partake with abandon. Luxuriate in the art deco-esque illustrations and ignore the thinner plot.

We Are Okay

LaCour N. (2017). We Are Okay. New York: Dutton Books for Young Readers.

We Are Okay‘s entrancing cover with a girl standing on her bed looking out into the ocean is perfect for this psychological mystery told through flashbacks. Marin is at 28243032university in upper state New York, having fled from California and the very people who love and want to support her following her Gramps’ death. Truly an orphan now, it’s turns out to be the secrets Marin encountered, slowly revealed to us, that made her abruptly leave home and cut off all ties.

When the story begins Marin is staying on an isolated college campus over winter break. Her roommate, Hannah, just left for Christmas, and now she is expecting a visit from her best friend, Mabel. As you may imagine, the December New York setting is stark, cold, and isolated, ready to match Marin’s depression. We aren’t privy to the background of Marin and Mabel’s relationship, yet like the rest of the story it Continue reading

The Wild Robot

Brown, P. (2016). The Wild Robot. New York: Little, Brown and Company.

Peter Brown’s art has come to middle grade fiction, and combined with his equally bare bones writing style, he has created a meditation on nature versus technology, a 26030734philosopher’s handbook, if you want to go that far.

After falling off a cargo ship and bobbing along in the ocean, Roz reaches the shores of an island where otters manage to open up her shipping box and activate her. Roz opens her eyes, looks around this place – the only place she’s ever known – and even though she is indeed a robot, she considers it home. However, survival quickly becomes her primary focus, when a storm sweeps her down in a mudslide, angry bears chase her, and a mama bird makes sure Roz lands with a clank out of a tall and sticky pine tree. Intriguingly, Roz begins to observe the island’s animals and learn their ways and their language. The line between real and robot is tenuous and appealing in Continue reading

The Hate U Give

Thomas, A. (2017). The Hate U Give. New York: HarperCollins Publisher.

Inspired by the movement #BlackLivesMatter, The Hate U Give is an incredibly relevant and heartbreaking account of a sixteen year old girl who witnesses the killing of her 32075671childhood best friend at the hands of the police. Everyday Starr leaves her own neighbourhood where her family owns the corner store, to attend private school in an affluent neighbourhood. Up until this point, Starr had done fairly good job of keeping her two worlds separate –dating someone at school who is white, while still being very much a part of her own community, until now. Even though Khalid was unarmed and innocent at the time of his murder, the press makes him out to be a thug.

The Hate U Give (or THUG) will inevitably spark discussion on race. It reminded me a lot of All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely because both books deal with witnessing a police killing of an innocent young black man and grappling with the decision to come forward as a witness, or not speaking up out of fear. Continue reading

And Then There Were Four

Werlin, N. (2017). And Then There Were Four. New York: Penguin Random House.

Five prep school kids are tossed together under mysterious circumstances. When one is 32074843-2murdered, they begin talking and piecing together what they know about their families, and a terrifying idea surfaces. What if they are all targets? The premise is classically entertaining, mimicking Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None, when a group of strangers are assembled on a remote island only to be murdered one by one.

The chapters alternate between two of the five friends, Saralinda and Caleb, she speaking in the present tense, he in the past for some reason, but both pushing forward the pace of the story. Nancy Werlin knows how to create complex characters whose voices captivate us. We become swept up into the mystery as they go on the run from their cloistered, island-esqe school to an actual island, Fire Island in New York. Here there are no cars, only dirt paths through tall grass, and little Continue reading

Because You’ll Never Meet Me

Thomas, L. (2015). Because You’ll Never Meet Me. New York: Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Because You’ll Never Meet Me
evolves through a series of letters between two teenage boys, Ollie and Moritz.20649195 Each letter progresses the story and illuminates their quirky, brilliant personalities.

It reminded me a bit of Everything Everything because both stories revolve around embellished medical conditions. Ollie is allergic to electricity; any small amount will cause seizures so he and his mom live a remote life in the woods. Mortiz has a pacemaker and was born without eyes yet has the skill of echolocation, being able to locate objects by reflected sound waves (as bats and dolphins do). Apart from the fact that Moritz lives in Germany and Ollie in the US, their health keeps them apart from one another.

Unpredictable from start to finish, this breathtaking story beautifully portrays friendship and humour.

Pandas on the Eastside

Prendergast, G. (2016). Pandas on the Eastside. Victoria: Orca Book Publishers.

A little book with a fun design on the cover caught my eye, and it was so easy to delve in and imagine East Vancouver during 1972, I had finished the story of Journey Song before29275024 I knew it. Part historical fiction, part alternate reality, it’s the story of a wilful and cheeky girl, Journey, and a wide cast of characters who live in Vancouver’s downtown Eastside when two giant pandas were gifted to the American people from the Chinese government. In reality, the transportation of the pandas went smoothly and didn’t stop in Canada, but Prendergast imagines a world where the United States and China have a spat and the pandas are delayed indefinitely in a warehouse in Vancouver; a stop in the trip that never actually happened.

Journey becomes concerned about the pandas’ living conditions in the warehouse Continue reading