The Hate U Give

Thomas, A. (2017). The Hate U Give. New York: HarperCollins Publisher.

Inspired by the movement #BlackLivesMatter, The Hate U Give is an incredibly relevant and heartbreaking account of a sixteen year old girl who witnesses the killing of her 32075671childhood best friend at the hands of the police. Everyday Starr leaves her own neighbourhood where her family owns the corner store, to attend private school in an affluent neighbourhood. Up until this point, Starr had done fairly good job of keeping her two worlds separate –dating someone at school who is white, while still being very much a part of her own community, until now. Even though Khalid was unarmed and innocent at the time of his murder, the press makes him out to be a thug.

The Hate U Give (or THUG) will inevitably spark discussion on race. It reminded me a lot of All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely because both books deal with witnessing a police killing of an innocent young black man and grappling with the decision to come forward as a witness, or not speaking up out of fear. Also how it’s not black people’s job to educate whites on white privilege. All American Boys 25657130quickly became one of my favourites, and it’s interesting to see the mass support for The Hate U Give. Maybe we’ll see more books written with this timely theme.

Girl power is another facet of THUG that is powerful. Starr is a well developed, strong heroine whose family supports her and loves each other. It hurts (as it should) to hear through their conversations and daily life just how inescapable racism remains.

What did you think about The Hate U Give?

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “The Hate U Give

  1. I loved this one too! I thought part of its power came from the fact that it shows Starr and her family as real people amidst the drama of the situation. There were parts that were hilarious in spite of the mostly dark narrative. I need to read All American Boys now too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The mixture of comic relief throughout makes the story so much more accessible. Without it, it would be a different type of book that may not appeal to as many people. And it’s more true to life anyway, to have both funny and sad overlap!

      Like

  2. Thank you for this review! I was considering picking this book for my book club to read next month, even though we are primarily a bunch of middle aged white women. I literally live less than two miles from where Trayvon Martin was killed and the effects of that day are still being felt in our city.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow. Let me know if your group decides on it! There’s so much to talk about that it should be a great book club choice, and it’s also a super fast read, which can be appealing to people in the summer months.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s